Herbal Tea

Soothing, invigorating, grounding, uplifting.

Red, yellow, white, green. Bold, delicate, sweet, sour. Floral, herbaceous, fruity. Roots, leaves, flowers, stalks, seeds. Herbal teas are quite a diverse group! The thing that unites them all is that they are made from botanical ingredients other than Camellia sinensis (the tea plant used to produce white, green, oolong and black teas).

Still unsure how to begin? Choose our Herbal Tea Sampler or our Hibiscus Tisane Sampler for a wide variety of styles and flavors.

And, of course, if you want to explore more, be sure to check out our related collections of Rooibos, Hibiscus and Yerba Mate, which are wildly popular!

Herbal Tea FAQ's

Do herbal teas contain caffeine? Are they decaf?

Unless one of our blends has true tea (white, green, oolong, black or pu-erh), yerba mate (which contains caffeine) or chocolate (which contains trace amounts of caffeine), it is caffeine free. In short, yes, these herbal teas are caffeine free.

They are not "decaf" though - decaf means that caffeine has been chemically removed, and we do not decaffeinate any teas. These herbal teas are naturally caffeine free.

Are herbal teas healthy?

Throughout recorded history, people have used plants to create tasty drinks as well as for medicinal purposes. Even before recorded history, our use of herbs as medicine was passed down by word of mouth from generation to generation.

Most herbal teas offer myriad health benefits and have been used for centuries for healing. However, we primarily select herbal teas (and all the teas in our collection) for enjoyment. The added health benefits are the cherry on top. So while mint tea might soothe stress and aid in digestion, we love it for its bright, fresh flavor, and while rooibos is high in antioxidants, we sip it for its mellow, sweet, black-tea-like flavor. As a replacement for sodas and coffee, you'll certainly see added health benefits from herbal teas, but again, the thing we love most about these herbs is enjoying their colors, flavors and aromas.

How do I brew herbal teas?

Most herbal teas are best when brewed for five minutes with boiling water. Usually, one tablespoon of herb per cup of tea is ideal. Check individual packages for more specific brewing information.

How are herbal teas produced?

Different herbal teas are made from different parts of the plant and are produced in different ways.

For example, chamomile is made from the flowers of the chamomile plant. The flowers are usually plucked whole, dried, and either used whole or crushed.

The ginger in our blends comes from the rhizomes (root-like structures) of the ginger plant. It is usually dug up, washed, sliced or chopped, then dried.

Fennel and other seeds in our blends are harvested long after the plants have flowered. The seeds are dried whole for maximal freshness and flavor.

Mint teas are made from the leaves of peppermint, spearmint or other mint plants. The leaves are plucked (usually before the plant goes into flower), dried and (sometimes) crushed for easier brewing.

And cinnamon comes from the inner bark of the cinnamon or cassia plant. The outer bark is stripped away from a portion of the tree, then the inner bark is stripped away and dried. It is usually broken into small chips for ease of brewing and maximal flavor.

Each of these herbal tea ingredients is produced in a different way, but the main idea is to pick the right part at the right time, dry it and (if it isn't the right size already) make it into a size that's ideal for brewing.

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Soothing, invigorating, grounding, uplifting.

Red, yellow, white, green. Bold, delicate, sweet, sour. Floral, herbaceous, fruity. Roots, leaves, flowers, stalks, seeds. Herbal teas are quite a diverse group! The thing that unites them all is that they are made from botanical ingredients other than Camellia sinensis (the tea plant used to produce white, green, oolong and black teas).

Still unsure how to begin? Choose our Herbal Tea Sampler or our Hibiscus Tisane Sampler for a wide variety of styles and flavors.

And, of course, if you want to explore more, be sure to check out our related collections of Rooibos, Hibiscus and Yerba Mate, which are wildly popular!

Herbal Tea FAQ's

Do herbal teas contain caffeine? Are they decaf?

Unless one of our blends has true tea (white, green, oolong, black or pu-erh), yerba mate (which contains caffeine) or chocolate (which contains trace amounts of caffeine), it is caffeine free. In short, yes, these herbal teas are caffeine free.

They are not "decaf" though - decaf means that caffeine has been chemically removed, and we do not decaffeinate any teas. These herbal teas are naturally caffeine free.

Are herbal teas healthy?

Throughout recorded history, people have used plants to create tasty drinks as well as for medicinal purposes. Even before recorded history, our use of herbs as medicine was passed down by word of mouth from generation to generation.

Most herbal teas offer myriad health benefits and have been used for centuries for healing. However, we primarily select herbal teas (and all the teas in our collection) for enjoyment. The added health benefits are the cherry on top. So while mint tea might soothe stress and aid in digestion, we love it for its bright, fresh flavor, and while rooibos is high in antioxidants, we sip it for its mellow, sweet, black-tea-like flavor. As a replacement for sodas and coffee, you'll certainly see added health benefits from herbal teas, but again, the thing we love most about these herbs is enjoying their colors, flavors and aromas.

How do I brew herbal teas?

Most herbal teas are best when brewed for five minutes with boiling water. Usually, one tablespoon of herb per cup of tea is ideal. Check individual packages for more specific brewing information.

How are herbal teas produced?

Different herbal teas are made from different parts of the plant and are produced in different ways.

For example, chamomile is made from the flowers of the chamomile plant. The flowers are usually plucked whole, dried, and either used whole or crushed.

The ginger in our blends comes from the rhizomes (root-like structures) of the ginger plant. It is usually dug up, washed, sliced or chopped, then dried.

Fennel and other seeds in our blends are harvested long after the plants have flowered. The seeds are dried whole for maximal freshness and flavor.

Mint teas are made from the leaves of peppermint, spearmint or other mint plants. The leaves are plucked (usually before the plant goes into flower), dried and (sometimes) crushed for easier brewing.

And cinnamon comes from the inner bark of the cinnamon or cassia plant. The outer bark is stripped away from a portion of the tree, then the inner bark is stripped away and dried. It is usually broken into small chips for ease of brewing and maximal flavor.

Each of these herbal tea ingredients is produced in a different way, but the main idea is to pick the right part at the right time, dry it and (if it isn't the right size already) make it into a size that's ideal for brewing.