White Tea

Smooth, delicate, ethereal, luxurious... welcome to the world of white teas.

Known for their low caffeine levels and high antioxidant levels, white teas have garnered a lot of attention in recent decades. These teas don't just live up to the hype - they exceed it. Anyone here looking for a healthy beverage may be shocked by how great white tea can be!

Still not sure where to begin? All our teas come in easy and convinient sample sizes so you find which one appeals to you the most.

White Tea FAQ's

What does white tea taste like?

White tea has a mellow, sweet flavor. It may taste floral, fruity, nutty or even slightly vegetal. Sometimes, it has a thick mouthfeel, which people call "creamy" or "buttery," or even a creamy taste. We think of it as oolong's super-chill cousin.

How do I brew white tea?

White tea is easy to brew. Use water that's below boiling - 170 to 185 degrees is ideal. Brew it for three to five minutes. The only thing that's tricky is getting enough leaf in your brew. Often, the leaves are so fluffy that you can't even fit a couple of them into a teaspoon! So, when in doubt, use more leaves. That'll give you the flavor you crave. After all, "delicate" doesn't mean "impossible to taste"!

What's so healthy about white tea?

Traditional white tea (white tea from Fujian, China) has been shown to be especially high in antioxidants and catechins as well as lower in caffeine than most tea types. That's great, but what we really love about white tea is its incredible flavor. It's so delicious that making a habit out of drinking white tea won't require you to remind yourself that it's healthy. If you're anything like us, you'll just naturally drink it often because you love to drink it.

If white tea and green tea are both unoxidized, what makes them different?

Good question. White tea is different from green tea in a few key ways.

While all white and green teas come from the Camellia sinensis plant, traditional white tea comes from a few different varietals of that plant. These varietals have a special characteristic that evolved to protect young leaves and "buds" (tiny, unopened leaves) from insects - downy, hair-like filaments that cover the buds and the under-sides of young leaves. These hairs are what gives white tea its silver-white appearance. These special varietals are also part of what gives white tea its special flavor, and the reason that white tea is low in caffeine yet high in antioxidants.

White tea is also processed very simply - even more simply than green tea. After it is plucked, it is immediately dried, either with hot air or by being spread out a hot, shady area. That's it! It's ready to brew.

Where does white tea come from?

White tea's home is Fujian, China, and all the best white teas are produced there (though we do occasionally find a non-Fujianese white tea that meets our standards!).

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Smooth, delicate, ethereal, luxurious... welcome to the world of white teas.

Known for their low caffeine levels and high antioxidant levels, white teas have garnered a lot of attention in recent decades. These teas don't just live up to the hype - they exceed it. Anyone here looking for a healthy beverage may be shocked by how great white tea can be!

Still not sure where to begin? All our teas come in easy and convinient sample sizes so you find which one appeals to you the most.

White Tea FAQ's

What does white tea taste like?

White tea has a mellow, sweet flavor. It may taste floral, fruity, nutty or even slightly vegetal. Sometimes, it has a thick mouthfeel, which people call "creamy" or "buttery," or even a creamy taste. We think of it as oolong's super-chill cousin.

How do I brew white tea?

White tea is easy to brew. Use water that's below boiling - 170 to 185 degrees is ideal. Brew it for three to five minutes. The only thing that's tricky is getting enough leaf in your brew. Often, the leaves are so fluffy that you can't even fit a couple of them into a teaspoon! So, when in doubt, use more leaves. That'll give you the flavor you crave. After all, "delicate" doesn't mean "impossible to taste"!

What's so healthy about white tea?

Traditional white tea (white tea from Fujian, China) has been shown to be especially high in antioxidants and catechins as well as lower in caffeine than most tea types. That's great, but what we really love about white tea is its incredible flavor. It's so delicious that making a habit out of drinking white tea won't require you to remind yourself that it's healthy. If you're anything like us, you'll just naturally drink it often because you love to drink it.

If white tea and green tea are both unoxidized, what makes them different?

Good question. White tea is different from green tea in a few key ways.

While all white and green teas come from the Camellia sinensis plant, traditional white tea comes from a few different varietals of that plant. These varietals have a special characteristic that evolved to protect young leaves and "buds" (tiny, unopened leaves) from insects - downy, hair-like filaments that cover the buds and the under-sides of young leaves. These hairs are what gives white tea its silver-white appearance. These special varietals are also part of what gives white tea its special flavor, and the reason that white tea is low in caffeine yet high in antioxidants.

White tea is also processed very simply - even more simply than green tea. After it is plucked, it is immediately dried, either with hot air or by being spread out a hot, shady area. That's it! It's ready to brew.

Where does white tea come from?

White tea's home is Fujian, China, and all the best white teas are produced there (though we do occasionally find a non-Fujianese white tea that meets our standards!).